Cannon Doc

Tonight I went to a theater to see one of the two documentaries that have been released this year about Cannon Films (not to confused with Canon, the camera company) and the crazy owners, Mehamen Golan and Yoram Globus. Electric Boogaloo: The Wild, Untold Story of Cannon Films was produced by Brett Ratner and directed by Mark Hartley. 

Are you wondering why I would blog about seeing a documentary, including photos?

I used to work there. In all kinds of capacities. Production stills, art department freelancer (advertising), acting, and lastly Art Director (advertising). It was an interesting and educational place to be because there were no walls so-to-speak so you could learn anything and everything about filmmaking (much of it was what not to do). I was privy to much of the inner circle goings-on through department head meetings and the fact Yoram Globus was the 'godfather' of my son. That honor did not stop him from burning me for 50K when I did a pile of advertising work for him right before the company went bankrupt. 

I was not at all impressed with the documentary. It was a long (listed at 106min but felt like 120), repetitive one-note presentation. And boring. It was structured chronologically by film and the people they interviewed were repeating the same comments with each movie they highlighted. There was more dissing of director Michael Winner than Yoram and Menahem. They skimmed over Cannon's SEC issues and their break-up, and barely covered the shenanigans that occurred when the Italians came to their financial rescue and somehow bought MGM, and then lost it. They only moving moment in the film was a frail Franco Zeffirelli speaking about his Cannon film, Otello, where he was given free reign and loved that movie more than any of the others he made.

 
 

Prior to the screening there were three trailers running consecutively on a loop over and over again (ugh), so I grabbed a shot of the logo that is tattooed on my brain.

I also shot the credits card for Death Wish 3...I was really surprised to see who who did the music.